Sentence Correction
Verbal Ability

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Q.

The first United States Solicitor General, Benjamin H. Bristow, born in 1832 and served in the Grant administration from 1874 to 1876. Earlier in his life, Bristow had served as a lieutenant colonel in the 25th Kentucky Infantry.

 A.

born in 1832 and served in the Grant administration from 1874 to 1876. Earlier in his life, Bristow had served as a lieutenant colonel in the 25th Kentucky Infantry

 B.

was born in 1832 and had served in the Grant administration from 1874 to 1876. Earlier in his life, Bristow served as a lieutenant colonel

 C.

born in 1832 and appointee in the Grant administration from 1874 to 1875. Earlier in his life, Bristow served as a lieutenant colonel in the 25th Kentucky Infantry

 D.

was born in 1832 and served in the Grant administration from 1874 to 1876. Earlier in his life, Bristow had served as a lieutenant colonel in the 25th Kentucky Infantry

 E.

was born in 1832 and served in the Grant administration from 1874 to 1876. Earlier in his life, Bristow served as a lieutenant colonel in the 25th Kentucky Infantry

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Solution:
Option(E) is correct

There are two main problems with this sentence.

(1) The subject (the first United States Solicitor General) does not have a verb.

(2) The past perfect tense had served is wrong as the phrase earlier in his life makes it clear that his service as a lieutenant occurred before his service as solicitor general. Consequently, the past perfect tense is not needed to differentiate the timing of the two events in the past.

A. the subject (the first United States Solicitor General) does not have a verb

B. the past perfect tense had served is wrong as it conveys the idea that his service in the Grant administration occurred before he was born

C. the subject (the first United States Solicitor General) does not have a verb

D. the past perfect tense had served is wrong as the phrase earlier in his life makes it clear that his service as a lieutenant occurred before his service as solicitor general

E. the past perfect tense is not used; the subject (the first United States Solicitor General) has a verb


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