Sentence Correction
Verbal Ability

 Back to Questions
Q.

A recent decision made by the United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, who many consider a leading contender for a cabinet appointment, is both seen by most legal observers as a savvy political manoeuvre and an abrogation of professional responsibility.

 A.

who many consider a leading contender for a cabinet appointment, is both seen by most legal observers as a savvy political manoeuvre and an abrogation of professional responsibility

 B.

whom many consider a leading contender for a cabinet appointment, is seen by most legal observers as both a savvy political manoeuvre and an abrogation of professional responsibility

 C.

whom many consider a leading contender for a cabinet appointment, is both seen by most legal observers as a savvy political manoeuvre and an abrogation of professional responsibility

 D.

who many consider a leading contender for a cabinet appointment, is seen by most legal observers as both a savvy political manoeuvre and an abrogation of professional responsibility

 E.

whom is seen as a leading contender for a cabinet appointment, is also seen by most legal observers as both a savvy political manoeuvre and an abrogation of professional responsibility

 Hide Ans

Solution:
Option(B) is correct

There are two main issues in this question.

(1) the subject pronoun who in the phrase who many consider a leading contender should be the object pronoun whom since the Attorney is the object 
(i.e., many [people] is the subject and the Attorney is the one being acted upon or considered).

(2) the sentence should use the idiom both x and y where x and y are parallel such that the sentence is structured as follows: is seen ...both x and y (i.e., both a savvy political maneuver and an abrogation of professional responsibility). The original version improperly states: is both seen...x and y

A. the object pronoun whom should replace the subject pronoun who; the idiom both x and y is not properly used

B. the object pronoun whom replaces the subject pronoun who; the idiom both x and yis properly used

C. the idiom both x and y is not properly used

D. the object pronoun whom should replace the subject pronoun who

E. the phrase whom is seen as a leading contender for a cabinet appointment is improper as there is nobody acting upon the object (represented by the object pronoun whom); the phrase is seen as a leading requires a subject (for the verb isand yet there is no subject, only an object)


(0) Comment(s)