Practice Questions on Reading Comprehension
Verbal Test Questions and Answers

Common Information

Although websites such as Facebook and MySpace experienced exponential growth during the middle of the first decade of the 21st century, some users remain oblivious to the fact that the information they post online can come back to haunt them. First, employers can monitor employees who maintain a blog, photo diary, or website. Employers can look for controversial employee opinions, sensitive information disclosures, or wildly inappropriate conduct. For example, a North Carolina newspaper fired one of its features writers after she created a blog on which she anonymously wrote about the idiosyncrasies of her job and coworkers.

The second unintended use of information from social networking websites is employers who check on prospective employees. A June 11, 2006 New York Times article reported that many companies recruiting on college campuses use search engines and social networking websites such as MySpace, Xanga, and Facebook to conduct background checks. Although the use of MySpace or Google to scrutinize a student’s background is somewhat unsettling to many undergraduates, the Times noted that the utilization of Facebook is especially shocking to students who believe that Facebook is limited to current students and recent alumni.

Corporate recruiters and prospective employers are not the only people interested in college students’ lives. The third unintended use of social networking websites is college administrators who monitor the Internet—especially Facebook—for student misconduct. For example, a college in Boston’s Back Bay expelled its student Government Association President for joining a Facebook group highly critical of a campus police sergeant. In addition, fifteen students at a state university in North Carolina faced charges in court for underage drinking because of photos that appeared on Facebook.

Although more users of websites such as Facebook are becoming aware of the potential pitfalls of online identities, many regular users still fail to take three basic security precautions. First, only make your information available to a specific list of individuals whom you approve. Second, regularly search for potentially harmful information about yourself that may have been posted by mistake or by a disgruntled former associate. Third, never post blatantly offensive material under your name or on your page as, despite the best precautions, this material will likely make its way to the wider world. By taking these simple steps, members of the digital world can realize the many benefits of e-community without experiencing some of the damaging unintended consequences.

Moderate Reading Comprehension Question - 21

Q21.

Common Information Question: 7/7

Which of the following best describes the relationship of the fourth paragraph to the remainder of the passage?

A.

It offers detailed examples to support previous assertions

B.

It provides suggestions to ameliorate the previously mentioned problems

C.

It summarizes the points of the preceding paragraphs

D.

It offers counter evidence and an alternative point of view to the claims made earlier in the passage

E.

It reconciles conflicting claims

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Common Information

Delivering a speech at an institutional gathering recently on the topic of ‘Rethinking religions’, a prominent, MP, said that by the middle of this century religion would be very different, that its present form would be completely unrecognisable, given the changes brought about by an emerging information society. "Religion as we know it will not be the same in 50 years. There has been a rapid democratisation of the world. The world is a much smaller place. The pronouncements of religions can therefore not remain the same," he said. More importantly, he maintained that some notions central to religion would not survive the future: "You have to stay with the times or you'll be left behind."

One wonders, if he had also been sitting in the audience listening to himself would his jaw have dropped‘? For if there's one thing we all know that doesn't change, it's religion. Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, etc, have lived comfortably through many technological and other intellectual upheavals in the past such as the Renaissance, printing and the industrial revolution, for instance, and have emerged even more stubborn and ossified if anything afterwards. Sure, peripheral elements change —heretics are no longer burned at the stake, sati is outlawed — but "notions central to religion" not surviving, say, the Internet, is laughable. 

That's because the central notion of all religions, concepts that are cold welded to the first few pages of any scripture, is that there is a God who is the creator of all things including us, that we have a duty to love and worship Him and that He stands for everything which is good. These things have so far reliably demonstrated a sure fire ability to endure millennia.

On the other hand, consider Parsis. More and more members of these modern day descendants of migrants who fled persecution in Iran more than 1,000 years ago, are turning to new technology to keep their ancient Zoroastrian religion alive and kicking. "Websites, blogs, on line directories and match making portals are being used by the close knit but scattered and shrinking community to stay in touch and true to the 3,500 year old faith," reports AFP. In fact, they're doing exactly the opposite of what our prominent MP fears: they're staying with the times for fear of being left behind. It's what all religions have always done in order to keep the faith.

Moderate Reading Comprehension Question - 22

Q22.

Common Information Question: 1/5

We can infer, from the use of the phrase "... rapid democratisation of the world", in the first para, that:

A.

the world is shrinking, thanks to improved communication.

B.

countries prefer democracy as a form of government.

C.

religion would have changed beyond recognition

D.

people are accorded more freedom in terms of choices.

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Moderate Reading Comprehension Question - 23

Q23.

Common Information Question: 2/5

As understood from the passage, what does the phrase notion central to religion not surviving, say, the internet is laughable" in the 2"" para mean?

A.

Central ideas of religion not able to outlast internet is ridiculous.

B.

Central ideas of religion not able to overpower internet is silly.

C.

As per information available on the internet, religion is not going to survive.

D.

As per information available on the internet, the central ideas of religion, will not be pertinent to religion in future.

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Moderate Reading Comprehension Question - 24

Q24.

Common Information Question: 3/5

What is the primary reason for Parsis turning to new technologies?

A.

To stay in touch

B.

To perpetuate their faith

C.

To increase their shrinking population by matchmaking

D.

To influence the other communities

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Moderate Reading Comprehension Question - 25

Q25.

Common Information Question: 4/5

Which of the following is NOT a peripheral element?
  I. Duty to worship God
  II. Sati being outlawed
  III. Heretics no longer being burned at stake.

A.

only I

B.

only II

C.

only I and II

D.
 

I, II and III

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